Add a filename in the command line when running a Python script

OR: Run a Python script with arguments You can add arguments to the command line when running python scripts by importing the sys module from Python's standard library and using its argv function. Some examples: A simple script that displays the user name: def main(): name = 'Frodo' print(f'Hello, {name}') if __name__ == "__main__": main() … Continue reading Add a filename in the command line when running a Python script

Display nested dictionary content sorted by key in Python

Given a nested dictionary like this: dog_breeds = { 'Labrador Retriever': {'life_span': 14, 'male_weight': '36 Kg', 'female_weight': '32 Kg'}, 'Beagle': {'life_span': 15, 'male_weight': '11 Kg', 'female_weight': '10 Kg'}, 'German Shepherd': {'life_span': 13, 'male_weight': '40 Kg', 'female_weight': '32 Kg'}, 'Jack Russell Terrier': {'life_span': 16, 'male_weight': '8 Kg', 'female_weight': '8 Kg'}, 'Rottweiler': {'life_span': 10, 'male_weight': '60 Kg', … Continue reading Display nested dictionary content sorted by key in Python

Profiling: check how long it takes to run a Python script

From Python's official documentation: "A profile is a set of statistics that describes how often and for how long various parts of the program executed." Python's standard library provides two implementations of the same profiling interface: cProfile and profile but I always go with cProfile for short scripts because you can invoke it at run time like … Continue reading Profiling: check how long it takes to run a Python script